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Golden Globes 2011 Predictions

Edit: Bold predictions were correct. 8 of 25 (32%)

Best Motion Picture – Drama
The King’s Speech

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama
Jennifer Lawrence – Winter’s Bone

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama
Colin Firth – The King’s Speech

Best Motion Picture – Comedy Or Musical
Tied: Alice in Wonderland or The Kids Are All Right

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Comedy Or Musical
Emma Stone – Easy A

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Comedy Or Musical
Jake Gyllenhaal – Love And Other Drugs

Best Performance by an Actress In A Supporting Role in a Motion Picture
Amy Adams – The Fighter

Best Performance by an Actor In A Supporting Role in a Motion Picture
Michael Douglas – Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps

Best Animated Feature Film
Toy Story 3

Best Foreign Language Film
I Am Love (Italy)

Best Director – Motion Picture
David O. Russell – The Fighter

Best Screenplay – Motion Picture
Stuart Blumberg, Lisa Cholodenko – The Kids Are All Right

Best Original Score – Motion Picture
Danny Elfman – Alice in Wonderland

Best Original Song – Motion Picture
“There’s A Place For Us” – Chronicles Of Narnia: The Voyage Of The Dawn Treader

Best Television Series – Drama
Dexter (SHOWTIME)

Best Performance by an Actress In A Television Series – Drama
Katey Sagal – Sons Of Anarchy

Best Performance by an Actor In A Television Series – Drama
Jon Hamm – Mad Men (AMC)

Best Television Series – Comedy Or Musical
Tie: 30 Rock (NBC) or The Big Bang Theory (CBS)

Best Performance by an Actress In A Television Series – Comedy Or Musical
Tina Fey – 30 Rock (NBC)

Best Performance by an Actor In A Television Series – Comedy Or Musical
Jim Parsons – The Big Bang Theory (CBS)

Best Mini-Series Or Motion Picture Made for Television
The Pacific (HBO)

Best Performance by an Actress In A Mini-series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Romola Garai – Emma

Best Performance by an Actor in a Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Al Pacino – You Don’t Know Jack (HBO)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Jane Lynch – Glee (FOX)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Chris Colfer – Glee (FOX)

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LED vs. LCD

This week I was looking into buying a new TV. I know for sure that I’m not looking at a plasma. When the sales representative was explaining the different TVs she started describing LED TVs as better TVs. This led to the question, isn’t a LED TV a LCD display. The answer I got was no it is better than a LCD, that it worked like a LED stop light that the LEDs change colour.

This is wrong! All LED TVs are LCD TVs but all LCD TVs are not LED TVs.

What is LCD? It is basically like the old fashion calculators, as an electric current hits a liquid crystal (the LC in LCD) it rotates the crystal changing the wave lengths to make a RGBK {Red, Green, Blue, and Black} (or in a few RGBYK {adds Yellow})  to the back light.

Then what’s the diff?

The difference is in the back-light. A TV referred to by the store as a LCD TV is in-fact a lit in the back by a fluorescent back-light. This back-light will last a ;long time but will eventually burn out.  This is similar to the monitor that you are likely reading this on, like a laptop or cell phone screen (most anyways).

The LED (Light Emitting Diode) is the light bulb used to light the LCD panel. Seems to simple eh? While it is, there are two main types of LED TVs edge lit and local dimming. With edge lit the LED Bulbs are around the edge of the display and light the display. Where local dimming has lots of smaller regions that can be dimmed on and off to give a better black.

A really good website that for further reading is LCD TV Buying Guide.

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2010 Golden Globe Award Predictions

Once again as the award season approaches here are my predictions for the 2010 Golden Globe Awards tonight.

Best Motion Picture – Drama
Up In The Air

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama
Sandra Bullock – The Blind Side

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama
Morgan Freeman – Invictus

Best Motion Picture – Comedy Or Musical
Julie & Julia

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Comedy Or Musical
Sandra Bullock – The Proposal

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Comedy Or Musical
Daniel Day-Lewis – Nine

Best Performance by an Actress In A Supporting Role in a Motion Picture
Anna Kendrick – Up In The Air

Best Performance by an Actor In A Supporting Role in a Motion Picture
Matt Damon – Invictus

Best Animated Feature Film
Fantastic Mr. Fox

Best Foreign Language Film
The Maid (La Nana) (Chile)

Best Director – Motion Picture
Jason Reitman – Up In The Air

Best Screenplay – Motion Picture
Jason Reitman, Sheldon Turner – Up In The Air

Best Original Score – Motion Picture
Karen O and Carter Burwell – Where The Wild Things Are

Best Original Song – Motion Picture
“I Want To Come Home” – Everybody’s Fine
Music & Lyrics By: Paul McCartney

Best Television Series – Drama
Dexter (SHOWTIME)

Best Performance by an Actress In A Television Series – Drama
Julianna Margulies – The Good Wife (CBS)

Best Performance by an Actor In A Television Series – Drama
Hugh Laurie – House (FOX)

Best Television Series – Comedy Or Musical
30 Rock (NBC)

Best Performance by an Actress In A Television Series – Comedy Or Musical
Tina Fey – 30 Rock (NBC)

Best Performance by an Actor In A Television Series – Comedy Or Musical
Steve Carell – The Office (NBC)

Best Mini-Series Or Motion Picture Made for Television
Taking Chance (HBO)

Best Performance by an Actress In A Mini-series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Drew Barrymore – Grey Gardens (HBO)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Chiwetel Ejiofor – Endgame (PBS)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Jane Lynch – Glee (FOX)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Neil Patrick Harris – How I Met Your Mother (CBS)

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Fox, Time Warner Cable reach deal to avoid blackout – Yahoo! Canada News

In the view of what may be in line for Canada over the next year in the camps of the Fee-for-carriage debate between “Save Local” and “Stop the TV Tax.” Although this seems unfathomable in the current landscape, the near future will see broadcast, cable, and satellite a thing of the past to internet based distribution methods.

Why pay for 100’s of channels that you do not watch? Why can the creators of the content not just distribute themselves? With devices like the Roku player, Apple TV, PS3, Xbox 360, and many others, we can feasibly get HD to your TV. Problems with getting broadband will als be a thing of the past soon as 4G LTE cellular networks with 51 mb/s connections will make getting fast internet to people easier and cheaper. Even more so in less that 5 years with 5G

“In the last 12 months talks between cable operators and program providers have become even more tense. Programmers have been seeking better affiliate fees as they have seen advertising revenue hurt by the U.S. economic downturn and remain uncertain about the future of TV advertising as more marketers turn to the Web.”  Yinka Adegoke for Reuters.

Fox, Time Warner Cable reach deal to avoid blackout – Yahoo! Canada News.

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Open Letter to my MP on Fee for Carriage

Today I checked my e-mail hand found this letter from my cable television provider Rogers Cable.

Dear Rogers Cable Customer:

{snip}

I am now writing to inform you of yet another broadcasting policy proposal that is under consideration by the CRTC

After rejecting it twice, the CRTC has reintroduced the idea of having a fee-for-carriage: a payment to Canadian over the air broadcasters that could ultimately end up costing cable and satellite TV subscribers between $5 and $10 per month!
The proposal is being championed by over the air television networks such as CTV and Global (Canwest Media). These companies also own highly profitable specialty channels, such as TSN and History, and therefore overall are financially healthy.
Furthermore, the CRTC has suggested that if the cable and satellite distributors don’t go along with the fee-for-carriage scheme, the television signals of American network stations, (NBC, ABC, CBS, FOX and PBS) which we have distributed since cable TV began, will be taken away.

The “fee for carriage” proposal is strongly opposed by Rogers and most other cable and satellite distributors.
You as a cable TV customer can take a definitive position to oppose this new tax, called “fee-for-carriage”.
To do so you should contact the CRTC before September 14.

Simply tell the CRTC what you think of the idea of “fee-for-carriage” by clicking on this link: http://support.crtc.gc.ca/rapidscin/default.aspx?lang=En
• Then Click on the 2009-411-3 under the heading “Notice # / Deadline Date”
• Select the “Comment” option in the drop box
• Fill out your comment.
• Follow the remaining instructions until you are done.
You may also contact your Member of Parliament by e-mail, regular mail or telephone. MPs always appreciate hearing from their constituents.

Philip B. Lind
Vice Chairman, Rogers Communications Inc.

So, I’m going to put the following letter in the mail on Monday:

Mr. Rodney Weston
Member of Parliament – Saint John
House of Commons
Ottawa ON K1A 0A6

September 4, 2009

RE: Fee for Carriage

Greetings Mr. Weston

The proposal before the CRTC concerns me greatly. Many of your constituents rely greatly on power of television as one of the only sources of knowledge and entertainment. With the coming decommissioning of analogue TV signals across Canada and that fact that digital signals do not have the range of an Analog signal many are or will be forced to bring in signals via the use of an intermediary such as a Cable, Satellite, or future IPTV provider would be not only a benefit but a necessity.

It is also not level in fairness either since many of these stations provide their programming or parts of as streams or downloads via IPTV (over the internet). If a fee for carriage is introduced it should also come with an opt-out to receiving those selected channels or be charged to users the receive OTA (Over the air Signals) as it is not fair to charge some of the potential viewers of the signal and not others.

In addition, this is a tax on the poor in out community, demographic research proves that largest demographic of viewers in Canada is the low to fixed income bracket. It is proven that this area of the population of subscribers subscribe to Cable and Satellite services, as it is one of the more affordable means of entertainment for larger families. This is truly a significant proportion of your constituents in Saint John.

In conclusion, the local television content providers not only should but also must find a different model of producing content. This must not be allowed to be it.

Yours truly,

Charles E. Frees-Melvin

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Why not to “Save Local”

Today I seem ads on CTVGlobeMedia stations that are urging the government to require cable/satellite distributors to pay for distributing the signal. I think this is just plain wrong. Here in Saint John there are 4 broadcast stations CBAT (CBC Fredericton but licensed and has its main transmitter in Saint John), CKLT (Has no programming differences from CJCH (CTV Atlantic) in Halifax, NS), CIHF-TV-2 (a semi satellite of CIHF-TV known as Global Maritimes from Halifax.), and CBAFT-1 which is a re-transmitter of CBAFT the Radio-Canada Moncton feed.
When it comes to local programming CTV is the absolute worst, as I have noted before at most has 2 stories from the Saint John area and 4-5 total from the entire Province of New Brunswick on a good day. Global TV despite their severe cut backs have managed to keep their news stories basically equal per province.
The basics is that all 4 of these broadcasters offer their signals for free over-the-air (a.k.a. poverty-vision). The cable company simply re-transmits the feed via an antenna to cables to the subscribers. Why should we pay to have something that we get for free anyway? In fact this even benefits the TV stations by making it more convenient to watch the stations resulting in more viewers rather than switching over to better content from away. Thus removing ad dollars.

In less dense markets like the Maritimes TV must come up with a different model in order to survive. Depending on a single news program is clearly not the way to go, but neither is alienating the viewers by making some pay, while others do not. Do we consider a TV tax like the United Kingdom? I don’t thinks so either but fees must not be duel standard. The CRTC recently made a decision that requires distributors to no longer require a bundle of channels. In this schema you can choose to not purchase stations, adding fees will just doom local programming to certain failures.

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A drop in the bucket… err… table

Who is left to tell the tail abount the drop. This may be just a little drop of coffee on the table, but who will tell the world.

It was interesting to learn the only part of CBC during these layoffs are the CBC.ca department.

The web seems to now finally be changing the directon of media. The idea that you don’t need huge television systems, broadcast transmitters, and printing presses to the people. To those ends there is now not a need for the content to suffe either.

The question however is how will interactive benefit the telling of the news? Can the local not be lost to a global voice? Can the web emerge as a primary source for news rather than current methods as regurgitation of the news reported by old media sour we and techniques?