Urban Renewal Saint John Update

I have received several posts on the book, and I don’t know how anyone can still get a copy, but for historical purposes, and that fact that my other post is one of the most popular sites here is some of the content from the former website for the book that is no longer on-line.

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The Books that Bite and Sting

Let's Pretend this Never Happened Cover

Franz Kafka said, “we ought to read only books that bite and sting us.” What’s the last thing you read that bit and stung you, and why?

Let's Pretend this Never Happened Cover
Let’s Pretend this Never Happened

This is one thing that is difficult to come up with. Over the past 2 years I have bought almost a dozen new books that I have not finished. I still have “1000 Years of Annoying the French” and my newest purchase “Let’s Pretend This Never Happened” by Jenny Lawson on the go. By on the go, I mean that they are in my room with bookmarks marking the page I am on. And by bookmark I mean the sales receipt it came with.

Although I did finish an e-book the bites. In more ways than one. It was “Dead Sexy Vampire Erotica” by Kim Corum. It is about a woman who is married to a vampire and she hates her life most of the time and can’t stand him or his friends except for the “Erotic” part that makes up for it. It is one of those things that is so bad you can’t stop reading. Much like Patricia Harkins-Bradley’s “The Diamond Club” except worse.

Urban Renewal Saint John

I was walking through the market this weekend when I seen taking with elderly ladies talking with the clerk at Baleman’s in the Saint John City Market holding this article. It was nice to see the interest as I have been working with the authour on her website at http://www.ursj.ca.

Book revisits urban renewal era

Published Tuesday September 23rd, 2008
History City native’s book shows how the 1960s began a period of transformation
BRUCE BARTLETT
TELEGRAPH-JOURNAL

SAINT JOHN – Most schoolchildren learn something about how the Great Fire of 1877 changed the look of the city, but how many are aware of events closer in time that have had a far greater impact on the landscape of the city?

Soon, such information will be readily available, thanks to the efforts of Brenda Peters McDermott.

The Saint John native has put together a collection of photographs and documents showing just how much the urban renewal projects of the 1960s through the 1980s made the city what it is today.

Her book, Urban Renewal Saint John: A City Transformed, shows the tremendous impact the project had on the old east end, north end and city centre, culminating with the opening of Market Square in 1983.

An urban renewal study in 1956 discovered that out of 13,000 dwellings in the city, 4,000 needed to be immediately demolished and another 8,000 were in fair to poor condition, leaving only 1,000 that could be described as good, said McDermott. Continue reading “Urban Renewal Saint John”