Journalistic Writings

The death of Renée “Rena” Belliveau of Saint John, NB, occurred on Wednesday, September 19, 2012, after a long and happy life. She was born in West Saint John on June 2, 1927 and was a daughter of the late Andrew and Olive (Babineau) Cormier.

Renée was employed at many jobs notably the DVA Hospital and Woolworth’s from which she retired.

Survived by her brothers, Arthur Cormier of West Saint John, and Ronald Cormier of Bowmanville, ON. Many nieces and nephews also survive Renée.  Although Renée did not have any of her own children she helped her sister raise her niece Catherine Melvin (Morin) for many years whom remained close to Renée, and her children Charles Frees-Melvin and Rosa Frees-Melvin that assisted Renée right to the end.

Renée is predeceased by her husband and love of her life Charles Belliveau; brothers, Joseph, Frederick, Lawrence, and Ralph sisters; Freda Cormier, Bella Felder, Eva Cormier, and Maria Morin.

Resting at Fitzpatrick’s Funeral Home, 100 Waterloo Street, Saint John (634-1965) with visiting on Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 PM. Mass of Christian Burial will held on Saturday, September 22, 2012 from Our Lady of the Assumption Church at 10:00 AM. Interment to take place at Holy Cross Cemetery. For those who wish, remembrances may be made to a charity of the donor’s choice, would be appreciated.

Journalistic Writings, Shopping

From the beginnings of time every Therian has wondered if there was intelligent life beyond the Planet There. As it turns out there now is. Earlier this week Michael Wilson announced the launch of in partnership with Groovenet, There Philippines. There Philippines opened this week as an Alpha Release with very controlled testing being done.Â

Many of you readers are curious about what is this new place is like, and to be honest it is identical in look to our There. But the people are very different. We newcomers to the US their service have been taught the ropes on what behavior is well accepted. This is not the case in There Philippines has a totally different social and geographical dynamic. In general with all the members coming from the Philippines there is a lot of conversation taking place in Tagalog and English, the official language of the Philippines. In addition there is a very strong social dynamic that is forming. Everyone is friends in this world. To be quite honest There Philippines is like an Eden to some of the problems that we meet in the everyday life of a Therian.

Since this new there is based out of the Philippines there is a very different economic model then the world we know so that means that this version of there has a different system to handle the purchasing of Tbux. In this version of There you begin by creating an account on groovenet.ph from there, there are 3 payment systems currently since this is in Alpha Testing only one is currently available. This site handles all the logging in to the system and the Buy Tbux pages. This has been very effective so far in keeping the There Philippines from becoming over run. From my point of view not being a US resident it is inconvenient at times to exchange money to a US currency, this is part of what makes There Philippines great.

The President of Groovenet, Inc., and avie named Cole hangs out all night with the Philippi Therians in Tiki Cove Plaza there are usually several chat groups formed around there. They tend to mostly like to stay there at this time, but there are several people that like to explore the world and visit the cool There “Landmarks” and love to see over the next ridge. One example in an avie named Faith; we have spent the last week going from Maidenflight in Ootay to the far reaches Astrology Island. The worlds are so totally identical right down to the infamous terrain spit on Mt. NeNe.

So until next week, Ako po ay taos-pusong nagpapasalamat.

Journalistic Writings, University Writings

I have a concern I’ve noticed happening more often on buses over the past month or so. This effect is predominantly happening on the Hospital / UNB and East / West Routes.

As the buses are approaching capacity there are normally about three to seven seats left in the rear of the bus, however many UNBSJ students will notice only that there are no seats in the front of the bus and will stand half-way between the front and rear doors, causing a backlog of people standing.

I would suggest that the Transit Commission make it policy that all standers must stand in the back of the bus to make it more clear that there are free seats remaining. In addition I would ask that you contact the University to send out an e-mail to students advising them of this.

Journalistic Writings

Memorial: Charles Belliveau

Originally Printed in:

Saint John Telegraph Journal (February 19th, 2003)

CharlesBelliveau

Belliveau Charles-In loving memory of Charles Joseph Belliveau who left us three very long years ago on February 19th 2000.

You touched and helped so many people who it has become impossible to forget you. Your hand was always extended to the children and your heart to the beauties of nature.

Wife Renee, Nephew Charles

Journalistic Writings

Note: This article was originally written for Journalism 2023 Journalistic Writing in November 2002.
The 50th Annual Saint John Santa Claus Parade comes around for another year. This was a difficult production for producer Don Ferguson to organize volunteers. In addition, the float list was only available late on Friday afternoon. Three hours before the parade was to begin, we headed down the hill to set up the equipment. On arrival, we realized the taped introduction had the old TVNB logo and Parade 2001 on it. It was determined that we could just cover it up with graphics, but at about the time the parade was about to starting to come down the hill the tape got jammed in the machine and I had about 2 minutes to come up with an alternative. Then the parade went really well until the floats stopped coming down the hill in order of the list and then it was a scramble of; What float is it, type it in, bring it up and take it down and repeat for about forty or so floats.

After a hard day of work, after the family dinner, many families sit down to feed their brains with hours of Television. For a small dedicated group the night of TV starts differently, this group is not home watching TV they are making it. This is the story of the dedicated group of staff and volunteers at Rogers Television in Saint John. These people come together to get together and have a good time to make community television. One of the part-time staff members is often quoted saying, “This is not work it is a hobby.”

A typical shoot will begin with the Producer ironing out the technical details, arranging for sponsorships, and going down the volunteer list trying to assemble a crew together. The task of gathering a crew can sometimes be the most difficult task of all. There are three categories of volunteers. The first group are the extremely dedicated ones. This group will sign-up for just about every thing that they can. This group is relatively small about a half-dozen or so. The next group is the regulars they are usually quite dependable. The regulars usually have a certain focused interest, like bingo or sports. Then there is the third group that are either always extremely busy, lost interest, or do not even remember why they are on the list. This last group is where most of the difficulty in forming a crew comes from after the first two groups are exhausted the producer has to spend hours of trying to get someone from this group interested.

The volunteers all have some interesting stories that occurred during their years. This group comes from all lifestyles, call centre workers, retired tax collectors, former professional TV people, and car dealers. They range in the spectrum from students to retired. In general, they get together to make TV, not in a deadline setting like a commercial TV setting, but one of just to have a good time and make some TV.

After everything is in place the producer and graphics person get started doing research and graphic design as this usually takes up most of the preproduction time. Then there is set up, which could be as simple as turning on and adjusting a studio camera and wiring a few microphones. This can also be a daunting task like a hockey game which involves miles of cables to be haled all through the arena and taped down to avoid tripping setting up and adjusting a half-dozen cameras, half-dozen microphones, set up a replay machine, a fibre feed back to the station, and lighting for the dark areas.

In November is typically a busy month. The month started out with the Kiwanis TV Auction. This is a relatively simple event to begin with, in the beginning of October J-P Quinn the producer begins with organizing the crew and booking a mobile production truck to come down for the shoot. Then comes the cancellations, of the cancellation included the Audio, Graphics, and half the camera operators. On the Tuesday in the morning before the auction, I received a call to see if, I would be available to take over the graphics. Only two of us on the list that could do the advanced graphics required for the auction. I really started my job the day before the show. The auction required an animated introduction, over 300 lower thirds, or graphics on the bottom of the screen, and a credit roll for the end of the show. While I was working on this J-P and several volunteers went down to the Trade and convention center to set up.

Then the long-awaited show day came, it started with setting up the lights, microphones, and phasing or adjusting the colour of the cameras. The show went abnormally flawless. The second major production was the annual Remembrance Day Ceremony this was the worst show I have ever worked on. It started badly by the fact that we could not acquire a mobile for the show resulting in ripping out the rack used for the weekly common council meetings. Since there was, only one graphics computer in Saint John the plan was to send the signal back
to the studio by Fibre-optics and put them on there. The first problem was that the computer crashed ten minutes before the event was to start and I forgot to save the graphics. In addition, the fibre feed did not work so they recorded show on site. When Don Ferguson the producer for the show returned with the tape, we put the graphics, music and taped interviews on the tape. After we finished there was barely enough time for us to rewind the tape. The show look so awful there was almost no sound and the camera cables were not good enough to see anything
but backs of head.

Journalistic Writings, University Writings

Because I was in class during the time, the June Callwood was speaking in the Ted Daigle Auditorium at St. Thomas University I was originally not going to bother with this assignment. When I went to class, I started hearing all the other stories on this particular guest speaker I decided to do it anyway.

On the evening of November 1st, I sat down and listened to the rebroadcast lecture on the program “Ideas” on CBC Radio One. I turned on the radio to listen but there was very poor reception on my little cheap radio. After spending about five minutes trying to clear up the reception I gave up. Then later I had an insight that I could pick up the signal on CBC Radio One’s web broadcast so after missing fifteen minutes of the broadcast I began listening. Once I first heard the words coming out I became intrigued. I started to take notes but shortly stopped in awe of the remarkable voice of inspiration and experience. I cannot recall anything in part that she said but the words all appeared well-chosen and magical.

Journalistic Writings

It is a typical Friday morning in Uptown Saint John. There are a few people sitting around casually chatting to one another. The big issues on peoples minds are focused on what cuts the Mayor and City Council are going to make in their budget, that the one time great Saint John Flames hockey team are having their season opener later tonight, or that tomorrow is the first day of the long-awaited Thanksgiving Day long weekend. In all there is not much thought being given to the fact that in a small city an hour and a half to the north the queen is arriving.

Earlier as I waited what seemed to be an eternity for the bank to open, an elderly man slowly entered and joined me in the wait. Casually I asked him what was his thoughts about the queen. “She is not of great concern,” he said gasping for air, “There are worse ways for the government to waste money, but I like things the way they are, and I would miss it if it was gone. She (the queen) is a magnificent person.”

After leaving my table in Market Square, I took a stroll out on to the board walk. Out there I ran into two nice and polite women, who I later found out were Americans from the southern state of Texas. Apparently they had just arrived on the cruse ship, Royal Princess, that was docked down the street at the Pugsly Terminal. “Oh God!, I don’t know about these things but,” the older one said, ‘the current queen is nice, although I don’t know about her successors.”

When I approached a friendly, middle-aged man on my way down Prince William Street to my old high school he said, “It is not costing us anything, why change it?”

Questioning the high school students at Saint John High School on a smoke break went no where, many of them following my questions with, “What is a monarch?,” and, “What is a head of State?” This from a school that when I went there was renowned for being the intellectually advanced school in the city. I was puzzled is this going to be another generation of people who don’t really care, who cares is it comes or goes.

One student that understood the question felt that the queen should be replaced by Jean Chrétien after he retires in the winter of 2004 because, “He’s done a lot for Canada.”

Later on I ran into another man who felt that like most of the people who it does not really matter if the royalty came or went. He felt that before getting rid of the monarch they should get rid of the Senate. “They both don’t do anything but the queen does not cost a fortune like the Senate does.”

According to the Monarchist League of Canada the queen does not really cost us anything because we would have to pay for a President anyway if we got rid of her. According to the Parliament of Canada Website the Monarch costs about $1.02 per Canadian where the Senate costs about $6.73 per Canadian.

Journalistic Writings

As I sit at my computer and look out my window, I hear the very annoying sound of crickets. Most city people would find crickets a refreshing sound, not me. It was nice to hear them chirp when I first arrive in Fredericton but now this is day 21 and they never shut-up! That is over 500 hours of non-stop chirping; I hear them in the morning, and in the afternoon. I hear them when in the evening, and they do not even stop underneath the moon. Beyond the numbing sound of those awful crickets I can hear the bustling traffic from the near by highway eight. Outside my window there is a maple tree, if you look closely one can see that the changing of the leaves is about to start occurring. This is the sign that autumn, or the “almost winter” season according to sheet on a professor’s door in Edmond Casey Hall, is going to begin on Monday.